Monday, June 4, 2018

Basketball: Need to Know Craft and Art


Two lifetimes ago, as a medical resident, I got called to a "Code 99," a cardiac arrest. I sprint to the room and the nurse is trying to do CPR...and the patient is holding her off with two hands. "Make the diagnosis." Know what you need to know and do it. 

Can we think about basketball as performance art? If I watch a game and need captions to see what's happening, then how good is that game? Make the game the most beautiful thing you ever saw. Echoing Ron Howard, "the movie is made in the editing room." That implies a critical role for us as editors. We need craft; we love art. 



We know what we want to see. Can we get the characters in our play to buy a shared vision? But realize, the fans don't come to watch timeouts or practice. 


From Thellabb.com (hat tip: Lason Perkins)

We can't force players to eat broccoli, but we can reward players who eat their vegetables. 



The audience matters. Entertain them. Create "AHA" moments. Players are our characters. Skill and energy produce better drama and results. You love the fast break that went outlet, pass, pass, score. The players have to figure it out. 




How are we going to score? Okay, we need plot to score. We can't just roll the ball out. When we can't score, we need to edit those scenes. Most (not all) young players lack enough talent to freelance their way to success. Practice freelance small sided group play, but keep teaching tools (yesterday's Multiple Actions post). 

"What does each player want?" Each shares their desires with their play. Yesterday, I watched an AAU game and saw what I call an "only child" point guard. A player had very good skills but mostly played as though she was the only player on the team. "That is not how WE play." 

Who are the characters? What role do you play? As directors and editors, we want authenticity but within our artistic vision. 

Lagniappe:



GSW Fake Flare screen, slip for two. 




The Spurs show the distinction between craft and art (video and diagram). 

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